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A little of everything and every little thing is a Big thing to know about.

Dressing for Your Body Shape March 24, 2013

Filed under: ART,body,Daily,Personality,TIPS — TinaCulit @ 11:08 pm
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Triangle Shape

Triangle Body Shape

Best features. Shapely legs, a trim waist and head-turning hips give your body feminine appeal.

Common pitfalls. “You have a slender upper body, so your instinct might be to show it off with slim-fitting shirts,” says Saboura. Resist the urge! Tiny tops throw off your body’s balance, making your bottom look bigger than it is.

When you think about tops, think layers. Creating balance for your shape is all about filling out your upper half. “A cardigan is your best friend,” says Saboura, because it adds lightweight volume. For cooler weather, try cropped jackets that stop at the waist (channel Jackie O. for inspiration). Don’t be afraid to show a little skin, too. Three-quarter sleeves, wide scoop necks, and one-shoulder tops all look great on you.

Boot-cut pants are best for your body. “The slight flare helps to balance out curves, especially if you wear them with a heel to give your legs a little length,” Saboura suggests. Go for dark, medium-rise jeans with simple stitching and pockets in the back. For skirts and dresses, try a classic A-line cut that falls softly over your curves and highlights your trim waist. Avoid high waists and pleated skirts—they’re made for filling out figureless femmes.

Fabrics and Flair
Draw the eye up with bright colors and embellished tops. Saboura says, “Try a boatneck shirt with horizontal stripes,” or a cardigan with rosette detailing. Chunky jewelry can work well for you too, adding interest up top. Prints and patterns are fine for your lower body, but aim for darker colors.


Circle Body Shape

Best features. Slender legs, slight shoulders and a trim booty give your figure a graceful allure.

Common pitfalls. “Circles often try to cover up their bodies,” says Saboura, “but that’s the opposite of what they should do.” Showing off your neckline, forearms and a little leg (just a little!) looks elegantly classy—not to mention younger, longer and leaner.

Your body is soft and round, so your goal is to add structure, especially on top. Try a structured jacket (like a blazer). “Draw angles and lines across your body with wrap dresses or asymmetrical hemlines,” suggests Saboura. Draped fabrics, cowl necks and flutter sleeves look great on you, too, for a feminine flourish. If you feel like you need more support, layer with a dressy tank top that has a bit of lycra.

You’ve got great legs, so show ’em off! A slim, straight leg or bootcut is perfect for you, and wearing a heel “takes off a little weight and shows off your legs,” says Saboura. Dresses with ruching or gathering hide the tummy, creating an hourglass effect.

Fabrics and Flair
Prints and patterns look great on you, especially on your upper body. Go for large floral or geometric prints to flatter your figure—small prints won’t do the trick. Stick to weighty fabrics (like heavy cotton, wool or muslin) that have more natural structure.

Hour glass

Hourglass Body Shape

Best features. Big breasts, a slim waist and curvy hips make your figure the crème de la crème of feminine beauty.

Common pitfalls. Your figure has natural allure, so you may be tempted to give too much away. “Everyone is trying to mimic the hourglass curve, but you’ve already got it,” Saboura says. “Show off a bit, but don’t give away all your curves.”

Simplicity is key for you. Look for clean, simple tops with scoop necklines and three-quarter sleeves. Avoid layering, and look for waist belts that help define your tiny tummy. You look best in princess seams—long, shapely seams that gather in at the waist and flare out again at the hips—that have a smooth, snug look and show off your contours. Fitted jackets look great on you, but “they need to be really well tailored,” says Saboura. “Choose jackets that nip in at the waist and flair out, like a poplin jacket.”

You look best in skirts that stop at or below the knee, not above it. Pencil skirts look great on you, as do bootleg pants and skinny jeans. Choose pants or skirts that follow your natural curve, and go for fitted options (but not too tight). “Embrace your silhouette,” says Saboura. “The sexiness is in seeing the curve, not giving it all away.”

Fabrics and Flair

Keep it simple with solid colors. Prints can disguise your figure, rather than highlight it. The same goes for fabrics. Avoid extra fabric and draping, and opt for a bit of stretch. Color looks great on your body type, but monochromatic outfits look best (think: Mad Men’s Joan Holloway).

RulerRuler Body Shape

Best features. Slender and often athletic, your build is easy to outfit.

Common pitfalls. You have a naturally sporty look, so you may tend to choose simple, fitted cuts. “That can actually make you look boxy,” Saboura says. Instead, you want to use clothing to soften your body and create curves.

When choosing a shirt, “avoid adding more square or straight lines,” Saboura advises. Instead, complement your natural lines with asymmetrical or rounded hemlines, and ruffle details. Halters look great on you, as do boatnecks and off-the-shoulder shirts. Since your body is naturally athletic, you’ll look more feminine in tank tops with a thin, delicate strap. The same goes for jackets and blazers: Look for soft shoulders and steer clear of boxy, cropped jackets.

High-waist pants look fantastic on you, as do wide leg trousers. Both add curves and volume to your lower body. “If you want to embrace a more masculine shape with a boyfriend jean, go for it,” says Saboura. “But put some drape and movement on top.” For a ladylike look, wrap dresses look great on you, since they draw angles and lines across the body.

Fabrics and Flair
Use fabric to add softness and femininity to your look. Opt for lace, silk or lightweight fabrics, especially ones with natural draping. Embellished shirts and ruffle details add softness and give your body a bit more, well, body.

Inverted triangle

Inverted Triangle Body Shape

Best features. A tapered torso, trim waist and killer legs make you look confident and fit.

Common pitfalls. Your legs are typically well-sculpted, so your instinct may be to show them off with fitted leggings. That works if you’re wearing a long top (below your booty), but in general, you want to add volume to your lower half.

You look great in cowl necks and deep V-necks that help minimize a stronger upper body. Go for simple, fuss-free shirts (no ruffles!). For feminine flair, tops with gently draped fabric or flutter sleeves add movement and softness. Embrace your inner flapper, and rock a drop-waist dress—a look that few can pull off!



Sexy Leg WorkOut December 15, 2012

Sexy Leg WorkOut

This Challenge is designed to improve your muscular endurance in your legs and core. By using your bodyweight as resistance you’ll feel the benefit in your glutes, lower abs, lower back, quads, hamstrings and calves – all in all you’ll have sexy legs!

20 squats
30 lunges
40 calf raises
50 second wall squat
100 jumping jacks
50 second wall squat
40 sumo squats
30 leg raises
20 squats

sexy leg workout challenge Challenge rules

Not all types of physical activity are suitable for everyone. Users take Challenges and training advice at their own personal risk.


AMazing ReaListic Painting November 19, 2012

Filed under: Amazing,ART,body,UnUsual — TinaCulit @ 1:56 am
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What an amazing composition of realistic painting.. I was so amazed that this kind of details was even possible..  I’m only sharing this wonderful colours and figures this painter made..

Painting, realistic



How to prevent virus like Flu.. July 15, 2012

Filed under: body,cure,Daily,Life,STUFF,TIPS — TinaCulit @ 6:52 am
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The Magic word is “WASH”

How to prevent virus like Flu..



About Sleep July 13, 2012

Filed under: advise,body,Daily,Life,Online help,STUFF,TIPS — TinaCulit @ 2:44 am
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There are something about sleep we don’t know yet and it is a big deal when this habit is getting less now a days because of our lifestyles, our bad habit, jobs, and even the night life we do in our daily lives..  These things is not usually talked about but we all needed to know how it really affects us big time 🙂



 REF: Removed Link as requested by psychologydegree


The Eight Types of Intelligence -By Howard Gardner October 19, 2011

1. Naturalist Intelligence (“Nature Smart”)

Designates the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations).  This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.  It is also speculated that much of our consumer society exploits the naturalist intelligences, which can be mobilized in the discrimination among cars, sneakers, kinds of makeup, and the like.


  • You like the wilderness
  • You read about nature
  • You stop to look at bugs
  • You categorize things
  • You read about explorers
  • You collect things
  • You enjoy studying plant parts
  • You notice characteristics

2. Musical Intelligence (“Musical Smart”)

Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone.  This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners.  Interestingly, there is often an affective connection between music and the emotions; and mathematical and musical intelligences may share common thinking processes.  Young adults with this kind of intelligence are usually singing or drumming to themselves.  They are usually quite aware of sounds others may miss.


  • You’d like to be a drummer
  • You can read music
  • You criticize a new song when others just accept it
  • You enjoy a few types of music
  • You can figure out how to play a tune on an instrument
  • You’ve considered writing songs
  • You notice patterns
  • You remember old songs


3. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (Number/Reasoning Smart)

Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations.  It enables us to perceive relationships and connections and to use abstract, symbolic thought; sequential reasoning skills; and inductive and deductive thinking patterns.  Logical intelligence is usually well developed in mathematicians, scientists, and detectives.  Young adults with lots of logical intelligence are interested in patterns, categories, and relationships.  They are drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments.


  • You enjoy solving mysteries
  • You can solve logic problems
  • You’re good at math
  • You like to put things in their places
  • You’ve always been interested in scientific discoveries
  • You can be bossy
  • You like to figure out how things work
  • You’re good with computers


4. Interpersonal Intelligence (People Smart”)

Interpersonal intelligence is the ability to understand and interact effectively with others.  It involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others, and the ability to entertain multiple perspectives.  Teachers, social workers, actors, and politicians all exhibit interpersonal intelligence.  Young adults with this kind of intelligence are leaders among their peers, are good at communicating, and seem to understand others’ feelings and motives.


  • You sometimes feel like a mind reader
  • You hate injustice
  • You’re a good listener
  • You see through people who aren’t being honest
  • You know how others feel
  • You often lend a shoulder
  • You find it hard to be mean
  • You enjoy deep conversations


5. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence (“Body Smart”)

Bodily kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills.  This intelligence also involves a sense of timing and the perfection of skills through mind–body union.  Athletes, dancers, surgeons, and craftspeople exhibit well-developed bodily kinesthetic intelligence.


  • You’re good at sports
  • You can dance well
  • You talk with your hands
  • You’re interested in acting
  • You like to build things
  • You clown around in class
  • You have great balance
  • You can throw a ball accurately


6. Linguistic Intelligence (Word Smart)

Linguistic intelligence is the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings.  Linguistic intelligence allows us to understand the order and meaning of words and to apply meta-linguistic skills to reflect on our use of language.  Linguistic intelligence is the most widely shared human competence and is evident in poets, novelists, journalists, and effective public speakers.  Young adults with this kind of intelligence enjoy writing, reading, telling stories or doing crossword puzzles.


  • You are a good writer
  • You’re good with crossword puzzles
  • People say you “have a way with words”
  • You tell good stories
  • People say you’re funny
  • You like to debate or argue
  • You explain things well
  • You have a great vocabulary or enjoy learning new words and their origins

7. Intra-personal Intelligence (Self Smart”)

Intra-personal intelligence is the capacity to understand oneself and one’s thoughts and feelings, and to use such knowledge in planning and directioning one’s life.  Intra-personal intelligence involves not only an appreciation of the self, but also of the human condition.  It is evident in psychologist, spiritual leaders, and philosophers.  These young adults may be shy.  They are very aware of their own feelings and are self-motivated.


  • You think a lot
  • People think you’re dreamy
  • You can analyze dreams
  • You are self-critical
  • You second guess yourself
  • You really get into a good book
  • You can break down complicated ideas
  • You judge people


8. Spatial Intelligence (“Picture Smart”)

Spatial intelligence is the ability to think in three dimensions.  Core capacities include mental imagery, spatial reasoning, image manipulation, graphic and artistic skills, and an active imagination.  Sailors, pilots, sculptors, painters, and architects all exhibit spatial intelligence.  Young adults with this kind of intelligence may be fascinated with mazes or jigsaw puzzles, or spend free time drawing or daydreaming.


  • You can put puzzles together
  • You appreciate art or photography
  • You prefer geometry over algebra
  • You study with charts and pictures
  • You can find your way with a map
  • You make outlines when you write a paper
  • You doodle or draw
  • You notice details

Ref :




Perhaps the most notorious suppressed invention is the General Motors EV1, subject of the 2006 documentary, Who Killed the Electric Car? The EV1 was the world’s first mass-produced electric car, with 800 of them up for lease from GM in the late ’90s. GM ended the EV1 line in 1999, stating that consumers weren’t happy with the limited driving range of the car’s batteries, making it unprofitable for GM to continue production. Many skeptics, however, believe GM killed the EV1 under pressure from oil companies, who stand to lose the most if high-efficiency vehicles conquer the market. It doesn’t help that GM had a policy of hunting down and destroying every last EV1, ensuring the technology would stall right then and there.


In 1921, if the streetcar industry wasn’t actually naming streetcars Desire it was certainly desiring more streetcars. They netted $1 billion, causing General Motors to hemorrhage $65 million in the face of a thriving industry. GM retaliated by buying (or pressuring out of business) hundreds of independent railway companies, boosting the market for gas-guzzling GM busses and cars. The face of American transportation was all cars, cars, cars for the next half-century. While a recent urban movement to rescue mass transit has been underway, it is unlikely we’ll ever see streetcars return to their former glory.


The holy grail of automotive technology is the 99-mpg car. Although the technology has been available for years, automakers have deliberately withheld it from the U.S. market. In 2000, the New York Times reported a little-known fact, at least to most: A diesel-powered dynamo called the Volkswagen Lupo had driven around the world averaging higher than 99 mpg. The Lupo was sold in Europe from 1998 to 2005 but, once again, automakers prevented it from coming to market; they claimed Americans had no interest in small, fuel-efficient cars.


Nikola Tesla was more than just the inspiration for a hair metal band, he was also an undisputed genius. In 1899, he figured out a way to bypass fossil-fuel-burning power plants and power lines, proving that “free energy” could be harnessed using ionization in the upper atmosphere to produce electrical vibrations. J.P. Morgan, who had been funding Tesla’s research, had a bit of buyer’s remorse when he realized that free energy for all wasn’t as profitable as, say, actually charging people for every watt of energy use. Morgan then drove another nail in free energy’s coffin by chasing away other investors, ensuring Tesla’s dream would die.


In 2001, Nova Scotian Rick Simpson discovered that a cancerous spot on his skin disappeared within a few days of applying an essential oil made from marijuana. Since then, Simpson and others have treated thousands of cancer patients with incredible success. Researchers in Spain have confirmed that THC, an active compound in marijuana, kills brain-tumor cells in human subjects and shows promise with breast, pancreatic and liver tumors. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, however, classifies marijuana as a Schedule I drug, meaning that it has no accepted medical use, unlike Schedule II drugs, like cocaine and methamphetamine, which may provide medical benefits. What a buzzkill.


Despite how silly it sounds, water-fueled vehicles do exist. The most famous is Stan Meyer’s dune buggy, which achieved 100 miles per gallon and might have become more commonplace had Meyer not succumbed to a suspicious brain aneurysm at 57. Insiders have loudly claimed that Meyer was poisoned after he refused to sell his patents or end his research. Fearing a conspiracy, his partners have all but gone underground (or should we say underwater?) and taken his famed water-powered dune buggy with them. We just hope someone finally brings back the amphibious car.


What if you had a device that could see into the future and revisit the past? And what if you didn’t need Christopher Lloyd to help you? Father Pellegrino Maria Ernetti, an Italian priest, claimed in the 1960s to have invented what he called a Chronovisor, something that allowed him to witness Christ’s crucifixion. The device supposedly enabled viewers to watch any event in human history by tuning in to remnant vibrations that are caused by every action. (His team of researchers and builders included Enrico Fermi, who also worked on the first atomic bomb). On his deathbed, Fermi admitted that he had faked viewings of ancient Greece and Christ’s demise, but insisted the Chronovisor, which had by then vanished, still worked. Unsurprisingly, conspiracy theorists say the Vatican is now the likely owner of the original Chronovisor.


American inventor Royal Rife (his real name), in 1934, cured 14 “terminal” cancer patients and hundreds of animal cancers by aiming his “beam ray” at what he called the “cancer virus.” So why isn’t the Rife Ray in use today? Barry Lynes, in his 1987 book The Cancer Cure That Worked, details how Rife’s invention was discredited by Morris Fishbein, the director of the American Medical Association (AMA), after his offers to buy a share of the technology were rebuffed, although this has never been proven and the AMA has denied it. A 1953 U.S. Senate special investigation concluded that Fishbein and the AMA had conspired with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to suppress various alternative cancer treatments that conflicted with the AMA’s pre-determined view that “radium, x-ray therapy and surgery are the only recognized treatments for cancer.”


In 1953, when severe drought threatened the blueberry harvest in the state of Maine, Dr. Wilhelm Reich, the inventor of a supposed rainmaking device called the Cloudbuster, and he was contracted to bring rain. The Bangor Daily News reported at the time that within hours of setting up the Cloudbuster, nearly ¼ inch of rain had fallen across the area, despite no precipitation in the forecast. Curiously, it does not seem that Reich attempted this feat again and, in 1954, the government put a stop to his work entirely. After Reich’s conviction for selling a phone-booth-sized box that he claimed cured the common cold and impotence, in violation of FDA rules, Reich was sentenced to prison, where he soon died. The court also ordered that Reich’s inventions, their parts and any writing about them be destroyed.


A number of overunity generators, which produce more energy than they take to run, have surfaced in the past century. Ironically, they have been more trouble than they were worth. In nearly all cases, a supposedly working prototype has been unable to make it to commercial production as a result of various corporate or government forces working against the technology. Recently, the Lutec 1000, an “electricity amplifier,” has been making steady progress toward a final commercial version. Will consumers soon be able to buy it, or will it too be suppressed?


Billions of dollars have been spent researching how to create energy using controlled “hot fusion,” a risky and unpredictable line of experimentation. Meanwhile, garage scientists and a fringe group of university researchers have been getting closer to harnessing the power of “cold fusion,” which is much more stable and controllable, but far less supported by government and foundation money. In 1989, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced that they had made a breakthrough and had observed cold fusion in a glass jar on their lab bench. To say the reaction they received was chilly would be an understatement. CBS’s 60 Minutes described how the resulting backlash from the well-funded hot-fusion crowd sent the researchers underground and overseas, where within a few years their funding dried up, forcing them to drop their pursuit of clean energy.



Cold fusion isn’t the only technology to get buried by hot-headed scientists. When two physicists who were working on the decades-long Tokamak Hot Fusion project at Los Alamos Laboratory stumbled across a cheaper, safer method of creating energy from colliding atoms, they were allegedly forced to repudiate their own discoveries or be fired; the lab feared losing the torrent of government money for Tokamak. In retaliation, the lead researchers created the Focus Fusion Society, which raises private money to fund their research outside of government interference.



Nazi scientists spent much of World War II hidden in a covert military base somewhere in the arctic, creating the Magnetofunk. This alleged invention was designed to deflect the compasses of Allied aircraft that might be searching for Point 103, as the base was known. The aircraft pilots would think they were flying in a straight line, but would gradually curve around Point 103 without ever knowing they were deceived. The Himmelkompass allowed German navigators to orient themselves to the position of the sun, rather than magnetic forces, so they could find Point 103 despite the effects of the Magnetofunk. According to Wilhelm Landig, a former SS officer, these two devices were closely guarded secrets of the Third Reich. So closely guarded were they that neither device apparently survived the collapse of Hitler’s Germany, although the real tragedy is that no one has ever named their band Magnetofunk.



In the 1960s, the Liggett & Myers tobacco company created a product called the XA, a cigarette in which most of the stick’s carcinogens had been eliminated. Dr. James Mold, Liggett’s Research Director, reported in court documents in the case of “The City and County of San Francisco vs. Phillip Morris, Inc.,” that Phillip Morris threatened to “clobber” Liggett if they did not adhere to an industry agreement never to reveal information about the negative health effects of smoking. By advertising a “safer” alternative, they would be admitting the dangers of tobacco use. The lawsuit was dismissed on a technicality and Phillip Morris never addressed the accusations. Despite their own scientists’ publication of research that showed less cancer in mice exposed to smoke from the XA, Liggett & Myers issued a press released denying evidence of cancer in humans as a result of tobacco use, and the XA never saw the light of day.


15. TENS

The Transcutaneous Electronic Nerve Stimulation (TENS) device was created to alleviate pain impulses from the body without the use of drugs. In 1974, Johnson & Johnson bought StimTech, one of the first companies to sell the machine, and proceeded to starve the TENS division of money, causing it to flounder. StimTech sued, alleging that Johnson & Johnson purposely stifled the TENS technology to protect sales of its flagship drug, Tylenol. Johnson & Johnson responded that the device never performed as well as was claimed and that it was not profitable. StimTech’s founders won $170 Million, although the ruling was appealed and overturned on a technicality. The court’s finding that the corporation suppressed the TENS device was never overturned.



Phillips, GE and Osram engaged in a conspiracy from 1924 to 1939 with the goal of controlling the fledgling light-bulb industry, according to a report published in Time magazine six years later. The alleged cartel set prices and suppressed competing technologies that would have produced longer-lasting and more efficient light bulbs. By the time the cabal dissolved, the industry-standard incandescent bulb was established as the dominant source of artificial light across Europe and North America. Not until the late 1990s did compact fluorescent bulbs begin to edge into the worldwide lighting market as an alternative.



How did Ed Leedskalnin build the massive Coral Castle in Homestead, Florida, out of giant chunks 
of coral weighing up to 30 tons each with no heavy equipment and no outside help? Theories abound,
including anti-gravity devices, magnetic resonance and alien technology, but the answer may never be
known. Leedskalnin died in 1951 without any written plans or clues as to his techniques. The centerpiece 
of the castle, which is now a museum open to the public, is a nine-ton gate that used to move with light 
pressure from one finger. After the gate's bearings wore out in the 1980s, a crew of five took more than 
two weeks to fix it, although they never did get it to work as effortlessly as Leedskalnin's original 

The father of our country, George Washington, who is rumored to have said "I cannot tell a lie," was a 
proud supporter of the hemp seed. Of course, the only thing more suppressed in this country than an honest 
politician is hemp, which is often mistakenly for marijuana and therefore unfairly maligned. Governmental 
roadblocks, meanwhile, prevent hemp from becoming the leader in extracting ethanol, allowing environmentally 
damaging sources like corn to take over the ethanol industry. Despite the fact that it requires fewer chemicals, 
less water and less processing to do the same job, hemp has never caught on. Experts also lay the blame at the 
feet of (who else?) Presidential candidates, who kiss up to Iowa corn growers for votes.